Hypermapping Diocletian’s Palace: A City in Books

Hypermapping Diocletian’s Palace: A City in Books

with particular reference to the works of Robert Adam and Thomas Graham Jackson

Student workshop

Organisation and mentoring team

Cvijeta Pavlović (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Department of Comparative Literature), Anči Leburić (University of Split, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Department of Sociology), Saša Begović (University of Split, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy – Study of Architecture), Damir Gamulin, di.di., Katrina O’Loughlin (University of Western Australia, ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions), Iva Raič Stojanović (Institute of Art History), Nelija Rudolfi (Society of Psychologists, Split), Ana Šverko (Institute of Art History – Centre Cvito Fisković, FGAG), Ivana Tadić (Institute of Art History – Centre Cvito Fisković Split), Ivana Vlaić (University of Split, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy – Study of Architecture)

Participants

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Comparative Literature:

Ana Kovačević, Sandra Malenica, Luka Bolonić, Marko Vrančić

University of Split, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Sociology:

Christy Koor, Larisa Hržić, Antonia Ninčević, Ana Vrgoč

University of Split, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy, Study of Architecture:

Luka Ćakić, Stjepan Dragoja, Samantha Pavić, Marija Petričević, Dora Stupalo

After hosting the interdisciplinary workshop for students of architecture and sociology on (Un)Mapping Diocletian’s Palace: Research Methods in the Understanding of the Experience and Importance of Place (May 2015), the project members developed a second one, entitled Hypermapping Diocletian’s Palace: A City in Books. This workshop, held from April 26 to April 28, 2016, was attended by students from the University of Zagreb (the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Department of Comparative Literature) and the University of Split (the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Architecture and Geodesy – Study of Architecture, and the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences – Department of Sociology).

The three-day workshop investigated the ways in which the Croatian shores of the Adriatic, and specifically Diocletian’s Palace, were notated in the influential accounts of Robert Adam and Thomas Graham Jackson. While the first workshop focused on drawings through which the travellers of the time defined key features of the Palace, the second year’s one put emphasis on the textual descriptions of the same spaces. It encouraged students to analyse the historical records in order to trace the physical and the intangible that the Palace has retained over the course of time and that constitute its unique “identity code.”

In the book Architecture of the City, architect Aldo Rossi writes: “Monuments often survive the transformation of their functions, and rather than lose meaning they may gain it. Urban places, dense with memories, become integral presences, the organs of that ‘body’ which is the city.”

Along these lines, the students from the three disciplines were asked to consider: What is it that man remembers, and what place? What is collective memory and how is it transmitted? When and how does a place become a monument? Can a city be written? And finally, what can research into different perception of the same place via different media and in different temporal circumstances tell us?

A description and the programme of the workshop can be found in Croatian here.